First Scientific trial


The Influence of a blend of Probiotic Lactobacillus and Prebiotic Inulin on the Duration and Severity of Symptoms among Individuals with Covid-19.

R Thomas*, J Aldous+, R Forsyth^, A Chater#,  M Williams* (2021) Infect Dis Diag Treat 5: 182.
DOI: 10.29011/2577-1515.100182.

Consultant Clinical Oncologist, Bedford & Addenbrooke’s Cambridge University NHS Trusts. Department of Oncology, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge CB2 2QQ and Professor of exercise and Nutritional Science.

+ Senior Lecturer in Exercise Physiology, Institute of Sport and Physical Activity Research (ISPAR), University of Bedfordshire, Bedford Campus, Polhill Avenue, Bedford. MK41 9EA.

^Department of English, Cambridge University, The Old Schools, Trinity Lane, Cambridge CB2 1TN

# Professor in Health Psychology and Behaviour Change, University of Bedfordshire, Director of Institute for Sport and Physical Activity Research (ISPAR), MK41 9EA.

*Research Manager, The Primrose Research Unit, Bedford Hospital. MK42 9DJ.

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Abstract (summary of study)

Background:
Gut microfloral dysbiosis is known to affect the majority individuals suffering with a Covid-19 infection. This study evaluated whether a specific lactobacillus and inulin blend, which aimed to improve gut health, could reduce the severity of early and chronic Covid-19 symptoms.

Methods:
From May 2020 to May 2021, we evaluated 126 participants with Covid-19, with an average duration of symptoms of 108 days, who were given 30 days of this pre and probiotic capsule within the ongoing UK national Phyto-v study. Symptoms were recorded using the validated Cough Symptom Score, the Subjective Well-Being questionnaire and the Chandler fatigue questionnaire. The group was analysed as a whole and then subdivided into 40 (32%) in an early phase of infection (average symptoms 10 days before baseline) and the 86 (68%) in a chronic phase (average symptoms 120 days before trial baseline).

Results:
Cough, fatigue and subjective well-being scores significantly improved over the 30 days in both the early and chronic phase cohorts. Participants who were more likely to have gut dysbiosis at trial entry, such as sedentary, hospitalised, older males with GI symptoms, had a statistically significantly better response to the probiotics. Gut symptoms improved in 25 of 31 (82%) who reported them at baseline. Two (1.5%) patients reported mild increased bloating and diarrhoea.

Discussion:
Following this nutritional intervention, participants had a significant improvement in GI and non-GI symptoms resulting in a meaningful improvement in overall well-being. Although some participants with early disease would have improved spontaneously, such a rapid improvement in the majority who had been experiencing symptoms for over 6 months, was clinically relevant and welcomed, especially among those more likely to have pre-existing gut dysbiosis. Going forward, our research group are now evaluating whether intake of this blend now known as yourgutplus+, could also enhance antibody titres levels post Covid vaccination.


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